Richard Hooker, priest, apologist, 3rd November 1600

Became one of the strongest advocates of the position of the Church of England and defended its ‘middle way’between puritanism and papalism.

Born in Heavitree in Exeter in about 1554, Richard Hooker came under the influence of John Jewel, Bishop of Salisbury, in his formative years and through that influence went up to Corpus Christi College, Oxford, where he became a fellow. He was ordained and then married, becoming a parish priest and, in 1585, Master of the Temple in London. Richard became one of the strongest advocates of the position of the Church of England and defended its ‘middle way’between puritanism and papalism. Perhaps his greatest work wasOf the Laws of Ecclesiastical Polity which he wrote as the result of engaging in controversial debates. He showed Anglicanism as rooted firmly in Scripture as well as tradition, affirming its continuity with the pre-Reformation Ecclesia Anglicana, but now both catholic and reformed. Richard became a parish priest again near Canterbury and died there on this day in the year 1600.

Text Reproduced from Exciting Holiness by kind permission of Brother Tristam Holland SSF