Mother Marian Hughes, religious, 6th June 1912

After reading an essay by Newman she felt a vocation to be a Sister of Mercy at a time when there were no Anglican Sisterhoods.

Marian Hughes was born in 1817, the daughter of a priest. After reading an essay by Newman she felt a vocation to be a Sister of Mercy at a time when there were no Anglican Sisterhoods. Nevertheless, she took vows of poverty, chastity and obedience before Dr Pusey as the first professed Religious in the Church of England since the Reformation and advised the founders of the Park Village and Devonport Sisterhoods. In 1849, she moved to Oxford and with Bishop Wilberforce’s approval founded a Sisterhood called the Society of the Holy and Undivided Trinity which served the poor, the sick and needy. Within a few years they ran schools, an orphanage and did parish work and in 1854. showed heroism in the cholera epidemic. The first house was in St John’s Street and they built a convent in Woodstock Road (now St Antony’s College). Mother Marian died in 1912 aged 95 and in the 71st year of her profession. The national newspapers paid tribute to her devotion to God and the poor.