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Hat-trick of success at Beedon CE School

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BEEDON CE Primary School in Berkshire has been praised by Nick Gibb, the Government Minister for School Standards after being placed in the top two per cent of schools in England for attainment in maths.

Mr Gibb said: “I would like to congratulate you for the very high standard that pupils in your school have achieved in the 2016 Key Stage 2 assessments. Your school results show that 100 per cent of your pupils reached or exceeded the expected school standard in mathematics at the end of Key Stage 2.

The praise follows an OFSTED report in November. Inspectors praised the school’s improving systems and processes. It also follows a SIAMS inspection in January, when an inspector stated: “As a result of the Christian character of the school the behaviour and attendance of learners is good and they achieve well and make good progress.”

Chris Prosser, the Executive Headteacher, said: “These accolades are well deserved and reflect the hard work and dedication of staff, students and parents. Athough it is a small rural school it has a unique character and a big heart.”

Praise from Ofsted for St Christopher’s CE School, Cowley

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Children ‘can’t wait to come to school in the morning’

IMPROVEMENTS at St Christopher’s CE School in Oxford have been praised by Ofsted inspectors.

The inspectors, who visited the school in January, rated it as Good in all areas. The report stated: “The Headteacher’s vision and dedication has transformed the school. She has made sure pupils’ welfare and safety is the top priority and raised aspirations among staff of what pupils can achieve. As a result pupils are happy, keen learners who, as one parent said, ‘can’t wait to come to school in the morning’.”

The inspectors praised the curriculum, stating: “Pupils enjoy a wide variety of lessons taught by specialists, including Spanish, computing and art. Pupils further hone their literacy and numeracy skills across the whole curriculum; l

Children enjoy the trim trail outdoor play area at St Christopher’s.

eaders place an emphasis on ‘real life’ problem solving to develop skills of independence and leadership and to help prepare pupils for their next stages of education.”

Teaching and learning were praised, as well as personal development, behaviour and the welfare of children. The report stated: “Pupils from all backgrounds thrive in this inclusive school. The vast majority of pupils are confident, self-aware, and are happy to talk to adults about their school and their learning.”

Inspectors stated: “Pupils’ confidence and resilience is further developed through attending the forest school. Here pupils actively engage in activities such as rope-walking, learning to ask for help when they need it and to talk about their experiences positively. Leaders are now making sure that those pupils who need to, transfer these skills to the classroom.”

Sheenagh Broadbent, the Headteacher, said: “This is such a great outcome for our school which reflects on the all the hard work of my talented staff team over the last few years. Our children are just fabulous and I’m so pleased that the inspectors could see how much they all enjoy coming to school and being part of one large family here.”

 

 

 

 

Oxford’s Ofsted success

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EVERYONE at the Oxford Academy was proud of the achievements that were recognised by Ofsted in a recent report.

The school, which is sponsored by the Oxford Diocese, the Beecroft Trust and Oxford Brookes University, was praised by inspectors for the strong progress made by disadvantaged pupils and the “rigorous and valid assessment” of pupils’ progress. The report described pupils as polite and respectful and went on to commend their behaviour in lessons and meeting their teachers’ high expectations.

The school, which is sponsored by the Oxford Diocese, the Beecroft Trust and Oxford Brookes University, was praised by inspectors for the strong progress made by disadvantaged pupils and the “rigorous and valid assessment” of pupils’ progress. The report described pupils as polite and respectful and went on to commend their behaviour in lessons and meeting their teachers’ high expectations.
The Oxford Academy was ranked 14th out of 6,382 secondary schools in England based on its Progress 8 score – a new government performance measure. Post16 also remained at a high level, with the 6th form being graded “good” once more. Niall McWilliams, Headteacher, who took over in 2014 said: “This is a fantastic achievement, which shows how far we have come in such a short period of time.”

The Oxford Academy was ranked 14th out of 6,382 secondary schools in England based on its Progress 8 score – a new government performance measure. Post16 also remained at a high level, with the 6th form being graded “good” once more. Niall McWilliams, Headteacher, who took over in 2014 said: “This is a fantastic achievement, which shows how far we have come in such a short period of time.”
This success comes on the back of a report by the Oxford Diocese’s Deputy Director (School Effectiveness) Fiona Craig. She noted in a report that 93 per cent of Church schools in the Oxford Diocese were judged as good or better by Ofsted, in March 2016 for new inspections. Fiona’s report stated: “This against a national average of 73 per cent is an excellent figure.”

This success comes on the back of a report by the Oxford Diocese’s Deputy Director (School Effectiveness) Fiona Craig. She noted in a report that 93 per cent of Church schools in the Oxford Diocese were judged as good or better by Ofsted, in March 2016 for new inspections. Fiona’s report stated: “This against a national average of 73 per cent is an excellent figure.”

Double praise for Hailey CE School

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INSPECTORS from both Ofsted and the Statutory Inspection of Anglican and Methodist Schools (SIAMS) praised the efforts of staff at Hailey CE School, in West Oxfordshire.

Ofsted inspectors judged the school to be ‘firmly good’ and highlighted many strengths including good pupil progress, strong leadership, good quality of teaching, excellent pupil behaviour and highly effective safeguarding.

SIAMS judged the school to be outstanding commending its vision and drive and for the cultural development of its pupils as well as the strong, supportive and caring relationships between all members of the school community, based on the school’s values of love and tolerance.

Debbie Davies, head teacher, said: “At Hailey School we instil strong moral values in our children, helping them develop confidence and independence as well as becoming kind and respectful individuals. This is balanced with a requirement for consistently high teaching standards and excellent academic progress for every child.”

Churchmead School celebrates success

by Jo Duckles

THE new school term saw celebrations at Churchmead CofE School in Datchet, Berkshire as major improvements were praised by both Ofsted and SIAMS inspectors.

Chris Tomes with staff, upils and officials from Churchmead along with Cllr Eileen Quick, the Mayor of the Royal Borough of Windsor and Maidenhead. Photo: The Windsor, Ascot and Eton Express

Chris Tomes with staff, pupils and officials from Churchmead along with Cllr Eileen Quick, the Mayor of the Royal Borough of Windsor and Maidenhead. Photo: The Windsor, Ascot and Eton Express.

The leadership of Chris Tomes, who became headteacher in 2013 after the school had been plunged into special measures, was highlighted in the Ofsted report published in January. Their comments were echoed in a similar Statutory Inspection of Anglican and Methodist Schools (SIAMS) report, also published last month.

“It’s the first time in 17 years Churchmead has been classified as ‘good’ by Ofsted,” said Mr Tomes. “Both of these reports are real accolades for the school. It was a highlight of my career to share that outcome with the students and talk to them about how they made an impact on both inspections.” The Ofsted report stated: “The headteacher is passionate about wanting the very best outcomes for all pupils in the school. His clear leadership has led to rapid improvements in all aspects of the school’s work since the previous inspection.

Later in the report they said: “Pupils value the respect that they are shown and the many opportunities to get involved in the life of the school. They enthusiastically embrace, and recognise how they benefit from, taking on leadership roles within the school community, such as: heads of house; membership of the school council; leaders of literacy; student wordsmith; student poet laureate and sports ambassadors. Some older pupils take on the role of blue guardian angels to mentor and support younger ones.”

Similarly, the SIAMS report stated: “Every student is valued as a child whom God nurtures, and this is demonstrated through the emphasis on emotional wellbeing, including the Blue Guardian Angels scheme, and strategies to improve attendance.”

Chair of Governors, Steve Buckeridge, who is also one of the leaders at the Datchet Gospel Chapel, said: “This is such an answer to prayer and a real credit to Chris and his team. The atmosphere as you walk around is wonderful. There are students from such diverse backgrounds, and 45 different languages are spoken, and yet the Christian ethos runs through such a diverse group. We have really appreciated the support we have had from the diocese as we have worked for these improvements.”

And what do students enjoy about their school? Preet, from Year 10, said: “The Churchmead values allow us to become a community and we consider our school to be like a family.” Liam said: “I like how the school has changed in the few years I have been here. It is more comfortable and I feel safer.” Daniel added: “I like to come and learn more. I really like art, drama, PE and maths.”

Former Diocesan Education Advisor Eddie Carmichael was the chairman of the Interim Executive Board, which was set up to support Churchmead as it worked to improve. Eddie said he was thrilled and elated but not surprised by the Ofsted and SIAMS inspectors findings.

“At every stage in the school’s recent journey from inadequate to good, it has been Mr Tomes’s quite unassuming but inspirational servant leadership, determination and high personal standards that have driven the school forward.” Mr Tomes said the next goal is to become classified as “outstanding” in all areas by Ofsted. He said: “It’s been an incredible journey and one that everyone at Churchmead should feel proud of.”

Celebrations at the Oxford Academy

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PRESS RELEASE

9/1/2015

THE Oxford Academy is celebrating the New Year with an OFSTED report that is an official record of improvements at the school in Littlemore, Oxford.

Behaviour and safety of pupils has been classed as good and the Ofsted report notes that staff and students say that they welcome the unrelenting efforts of the new principal, Niall McWilliams, to ensure that every student is valued and their needs are met, whatever their background or ability.

Niall joined the Academy in Easter 2014 while it was still in Special Measures. While he is aware that there is still a lot of hard work to be done, he was delighted that Ofsted had recognised the work that is being done to turn the school, which is sponsored by the Oxford Diocese, Oxford Brookes University, and the Beecroft Foundation, around.

Niall said: “We are delighted that Ofsted have recognised the improvements that have taken place at The Oxford Academy.  We are determined that we continue to improve and ensure our students have the best start in life.”

Among their findings, the inspectors noted that smaller group sizes for English, maths and science had a positive effect on the rate of progress, which is increasing and that the academy has positive relationships with parents. They stated: “Their opinions are collected regularly at parents’ evenings, with the vast majority responding that they are happy with the academy’s provision.  Parents are very confident that the academy will deal with their concerns, that their children are safe, and that students make good progress.”

John Putt, Chair of Governors, said: “I am delighted that The Oxford Academy has taken the most important first step to becoming an outstanding school. The team have worked very hard and deserve this recognition. It is the first step on a very long journey to excellence. We still have a long way to go but  I am now sure that we have both the skills and above all the determination to succeed”

Anne Davey, Director of Education for the Diocese of Oxford, said: “I am very aware that students, staff, parents and Governors have worked very hard to get this far and I am delighted that OFSTED has recognised is making progress. The Diocese will continue to support the school in making further improvements.”

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For more information contact Jo Duckles on 01865 208227 or 07880 716761.

John Henry Newman Academy aims for excellence.

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Children enjoy silent reading outdoors at John Henry Newman Academy. Photo: Jo Duckles.

Children enjoy silent reading outdoors at John Henry Newman Academy. Photo: Jo Duckles.

OFSTED inspectors have noted major improvements at Oxford’s John Henry Newman Academy.

Their report, published just weeks after official Church schools inspectors praised the diocesan academy, has given head teacher Jackie Ranger and her team encouragement that they are on the right track. Despite the school being classified as ‘requiring improvement’ the inspectors noted the following strengths:

• Children make good progress in the Early Years Foundation Stage

• There are good relationships between adults and pupils throughout the school

• Pupils spiritual, moral, social and cultural development is promoted well

• Improvements to pupils’ behaviour are helping them to make the most of learning opportunities

• The academy trust and governors play a key role in holding leaders to account

John Henry Newman was the first primary school to become a member of the Oxford Diocesan Schools Trust. The trust is working hard with leaders at the school to pave the way for major improvements.

Andrew Bevan, Chair of Governors, said: “We believe that our pupils deserve the best possible opportunities to maximise their potential. I am pleased that the inspectors have acknowledged the improvements in behaviour which show that pupils are also committed to making the most of the opportunity JHN offers. There is a good partnership between pupils, parents and carers, the staff, governors and Oxford Diocesan Schools Trust, which the report recognises. This provides a sound basis for continuing improvement with the inspirational leadership of the Principal, Jackie Ranger.”

Mrs Ranger said: “I am extremely proud to be the Principal of John Henry Newman Academy. We (pupils, parents, staff, local community partners, Governors, Diocese) are a formidable team who recognise that the pursuit of excellence not only takes time but hard work, love and courage from our whole school community. Our dedication, determination and commitment will ensure that we accomplish our vision of excellence.”

The report was published following an extremely positive inspection from the Statutory Inspection of Anglican and Methodist Schools, the Church version of OFSTED.

The report praised Mrs Ranger for her “Christian vision and commitment, despite challenging circumstances, resulting in strong, inspirational leadership.”

After school clubs, including Samba drumming and cheer leading, as well as a Good to BE Green initiatives were praised. The Revd Margreet Armitstead, the Vicar of St Mary and St Nicholas Church in Littlemore, was praised for leading regular worship in the school.

Fiona Craig, Deputy Education Director (School Improvement) said: “It has been an absolute privilege for the trust to work with a great team of committed staff and governers who have transformed the culture of the school into a place where all stakeholders are valued, expectations are high and pupils are cared for and nurtured to help them be the very best they can be. We now have the foundations to move the school forward in terms of academic achievements.”

Anne Davey, Director of Education for the Diocese of Oxford, said: “The governors and ODST are very proud of the progress that pupils in JHN are making and the people they are becoming.

“We are delighted that everyone’s hard work has been recognised and we will continue to work closely with the school to help it develop further. We believe in the power of the Littlemore community to give its children the best chance to succeed in life and to therefore be able to make a difference to the lives of others. We are thrilled that this report acknowledges the school’s role in this.”

Mrs Ranger said the next steps were to raise standards in reading, writing and maths.

The school, Oxford Brookes and the Diocese are co-writing a leadership course for all teachers which focusses on improving teaching and learning and rising standards across the school. She said a parent partnership worker will be helping ensure parents are also equipped to support their children in the learning they do at home.

 

 

 

Events

The Role of the Governing Body in an Ofsted Inspection

The aim of the course:

‘The role that governance plays in ensuring that every child receives the best possible education has never been more important. We should not underestimate just how vital the role of governors and trustees has become in helping to raise standards. It is also why Ofsted now shines a brighter spotlight on the effectiveness of governing boards, and reports on their performance and their impact in greater detail. In short, the role is so important that amateurish governance will no longer do. Good will and good intentions will only go so far. Governing boards made up of people who are not properly trained and who do not understand the importance of their role are not fit for purpose in the modern and complex educational landscape.’
Her Majesty’s Chief Inspector of Schools – Nov 2015)

HMCI’s recent instructions to inspectors to ‘shine a spotlight’ on Governance reinforces the key strategic work of governing bodies and the pivotal part that they play in the creation of good and outstanding schools. The inspection handbook has now been in operation for 12 months and our experience of the way the inspection workforce has applied the handbook and inspected governance has grown. We are clear that there is no let-up in the importance governance has in the leadership of our most effective schools. The expectations for the role and function of Governors is woven throughout the leadership and management section and we are clear of the way this needs to impact on the work they do.

This briefing will help give governors an overview of the inspection framework and its impact on their work.
Programme includes:

  • An overview of the focus to the 2015 framework on governance and an awareness of the implications for schools and Governors.
  • Understanding of how Ofsted focuses on governors in holding schools to account and challenging leaders.
  • Opportunities to discuss and ask questions from our experienced school inspectors.

This course is suitable for governors, senior leaders and Head Teachers of primary and secondary schools.

Course Leaders: David Cousins/Frances Bartlett

Cost: SLA schools: £45, or as part of Excellence in Governance package: £499 (10 modules over 2 years, 3 Gov.s per module)

For more information: To book: 01865 208272 or e-mail: training@oxford.anglican.org