Biodiversity loss and climate change

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Bishop Steven speaks at the Lords Select Committee for the environment and climate change

Biodiversity loss and climate change are inextricably linked. In a Lords Select Committee for the environment and climate change earlier this week, Bishop Steven put his questions to the Rt Hon the Lord Goldsmith of Richmond Park, Minister for Pacific and the Environment, Department for Environment Food and Rural Affairs.

Their discussion touched on COP15 and COP26 and the links between climate change, poverty and pandemics. Watch the video on Bishop Steven’s Facebook page and see more of his work in the House of Lords.


Big Clean Switch

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A very simple step that we can take to reduce the carbon footprints of our homes is to switch to a renewable – otherwise known as a “green” or “clean” – tariff.  This change need not cost more and can sometimes save us money.  So definitely worth investigating!

Choosing a new energy supplier and switching may sound daunting – but our partners at Big Clean Switch have done the background research for us and make the switching process very simple.

Big Clean Switch vet every supplier they work with and every tariff offered to ensure the customer service and green credentials meet BCS’s required standards.

Why not give it a go?

On your bike!

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Could you consider cycling?

Why not give it a go when you return to travelling more. Here are some tips and inspiration from three regular Church House Oxford (CHO) cycle commuters.

Steven Buckley, Director of Communications

How long is your commute?

I live near Reading in Berkshire, about 35 miles from the office and a couple of miles from the local train station. Prior to lockdown, I commuted daily via the train and my trusty Brompton foldable bike (which is over 16 years old). If I’m feeling fit, I cycle in from central Oxford. Otherwise, I get off at Oxford Parkway and cycle from there.

What do you gain from cycling?

The great days are when the journey by train and bike is faster than it would be by car. Oftentimes it only takes a little longer. The big thing for me is getting to work and read on the journey, rather than dead time in the car, and I’m getting my daily exercise too while doing my bit for the planet.

What’s your top cycling tip?

Just start – sticking with anything new for only a few weeks will quickly become a habit, and you’ll be amazed at the difference in your energy and happiness levels. If you’re new to cycling or unconfident, remember it’s OK to ride ‘defensively’ about a foot away from the kerb. It means you’re safe and easily seen. A common worry is arriving sweaty at work. Avoid this by wearing natural fabrics, dressing in layers, and not cycling too fast. As long as you shower before you set off you won’t be smelly, even if you do sweat. If you do want to don some Lycra and race in, then the shower facilities at CHO are fab. cycletoworkday.org has some great tips if you’d like to find out more.

Any essential equipment?

Punctures do happen from time to time, so carry a spare innertube and pump. Good lights are important too, even in the summer months.

What about bad weather?

There’s no such thing as bad weather, only bad clothes. I always have a rain jacket and waterproof trousers with me.

Best moment?

Cycling out of CHO and sailing past lines of traffic on a summer evening is always a special moment!

Steven's folding bicycle

Rhodri Bowen, Parish Development Adviser (Berkshire Archdeaconry)

There have been times in my life when I have commuted by bike most days. Since becoming a PDA those opportunities have been more limited, but (outside of lockdown) I cycle when my meetings are local, and I’m always using the bike to get to the post office or the shops: definitely my preferred form of transport…

What do you gain from cycling?

I love cycling, but I’m not a recreational cyclist: you’ll find no Lycra here! Ever since I was a child trapped in a rural village with limited public transport I’ve always viewed cycling as the most efficient, environmentally friendly, cost-effective way to get places – with health benefits! I like my car, but I take great pleasure in leaving it untouched. I guess it’s also turned into a bit of an unintentional challenge to keep my road bike on the road without consuming more resources. The bike itself was saved from years of disuse languishing in someone’s shed and has been repaired using reclaimed parts. I was annoyed recently at having to buy a new spoke, but since then I’ve pulled a discarded wheel out of a skip so I won’t ever have to do that again! I’ve often picked up tyres from the tip with years of use still in them – some people think they need a new set when the tread is a little bit worn like on a car: they think it improves grip (it doesn’t).

What is your top cycling tip?

You don’t need to spend any money. I haven’t ever bought any special clothes for cycling. I’ve never bought a bike, for that matter: my last two bikes were both given away by their previous owners – one through Freecycle – and if you’re a bit resourceful you can maintain them with minimum cost. I know that most people won’t want to do the repairs and maintenance themselves, and taking bikes to a repair shop is pricey. Maybe you know someone who’ll be happy to do the work for a beer! When I returned my daughter to university recently I pumped up the tyres, adjusted the brakes and oiled the chains of all the bikes that belonged to her shared house. No beers though, sadly…

Any essential equipment?

A lock. Even my rusty old rat bike will disappear at some point if I don’t lock it up. It doesn’t need to be an expensive lock unless you’re leaving it anywhere overnight or at a railway station, in which case go for a strong U lock plus a chain/cable for both wheels and, ideally, the saddle, and lock it to a post. Oh, and a set of basic LED lights, preferably rechargeable.

What about bad weather?

I get wet. But waterproof trousers are the business. A set of mudguards can make things more pleasant. I was once cycling back from a church service in a thunderstorm with a guitar on my back that was acting as an (unhelpful) sail, so I don’t recommend that. On that occasion another member of the church really kindly stopped and took my guitar home!

Advantages of cycling?

When you’re in your car you can’t just stamp on the brakes and look at a butterfly, whereas I do that sort of thing all the time when I’m on the bike, and stopping to chat is easy. I used to regularly bike across Newbury, from the logjam of the A339 on one side to the busy A4 on the other. You went from the freneticism of the road to the oasis of the canal towpath, with the opportunity to hear birdsong and greet people on the boats. For that five minutes, the pace of life just slowed, giving space for breathing and listening.

 

Rhodri on his bicycle

Tracy Makin, School Support Officer

How long is your commute?

The most direct route for me is about 10 miles from home to office, but I tend to do longer to avoid town and in summer usually make my commute home into a long training ride. Currently I am also commuting off road a lot because of the race I am training for.

What’s in it for me?

Time to clear my head.

What’s your top cycling tip?

Just get out and enjoy it.

Essential equipment?

Helmet, lights and puncture repair kit.

What about bad weather?

With the correct clothing it doesn’t matter.

Best moment?

Crossing Port Meadow on a morning with hardly anyone around and enjoying beauty and quietness.

 

Tracy with her bicycle

Bishop of Oxford appointed to Lords select committee

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The Bishop of Oxford, the Rt Revd Dr Steven Croft, has been appointed to the Lords Select Committee for the environment and climate change.

Diocese of Oxford divests from fossil fuels

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Diocese of Oxford announces disinvestment from the fossil fuel sector in strive to become carbon net zero by 2035

A Prayer for the Journey

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A prayer for churches, wherever they are on the Parish Pathway.

Lord, as we come before you,
We pray that you will show us how we can do your will
In our care for your world.
Grant us, in your goodness, ears to hear your call,
Hearts and minds ready for change and renewal,
Hands and feet ready for action.
Draw us together as your people in this place
Alongside your people around the world.
Help us to take the time to consider our steps
And sustain us by your grace in the way,
So that we may proclaim the good news in our care for creation
And show your love and justice in the world,
To your glory and for the good of all.

Amen.

Environmentally-friendly electric car for Bishop Olivia

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The Bishop of Reading, the Rt Revd Olivia Graham, is the latest bishop in the Diocese of Oxford to move to an environmentally-friendly electric car.

Eco Church and environmental audits in Wokingham

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A Wokingham church details its experience with the Eco Church and energy audit programme and describes the benefits they’ve seen since.